During the fifteen years since the publication of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, academic librarians and their partners in higher education associations have developed learning outcomes, tools, and resources that some institutions have deployed to infuse information literacy concepts and skills into their curricula. Provides vision for strong school library programs, including identification of the skills and knowledge essential for students to be information literate. Threshold concepts can be thought of as portals through which the learner must pass in order to develop new perspectives and wider understanding. ;] In addition, if you are a copyright owner or otherwise have exclusive control over materials presently available through this collection and do not wish your materials to be available through this website, please let us know. It also extends the work of the American Association of School Librarians Task Force on Information Gavriel Salomon. In addition, this Framework draws significantly upon the concept of metaliteracy,7 which offers a renewed vision of information literacy as an overarching set of abilities in which students are consumers and creators of information who can participate successfully in collaborative spaces.8 Metaliteracy demands behavioral, affective, cognitive, and metacognitive engagement with the information ecosystem. Experts know how to seek authoritative voices but also recognize that unlikely voices can be authoritative, depending on need. 1. This process of inquiry extends beyond the academic world to the community at large, and the process of inquiry may focus upon personal, professional, or societal needs. are inclined to seek out characteristics of information products that indicate the underlying creation process; value the process of matching an information need with an appropriate product; accept that the creation of information may begin initially through communicating in a range of formats or modes; accept the ambiguity surrounding the potential value of information creation expressed in emerging formats or modes; resist the tendency to equate format with the underlying creation process; understand that different methods of information dissemination with different purposes are available for their use. Information in any format is produced to convey a message and is shared via a selected delivery method. The novice learner may struggle to understand the diverse values of information in an environment where “free” information and related services are plentiful and the concept of intellectual property is first encountered through rules of citation or warnings about plagiarism and copyright law. Generally, a disposition is a tendency to act or think in a particular way. The Library has obtained permission for the use of many materials in the Collection, and presents additional materials for educational and research purposes in accordance with fair use under United States copyright law. “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy.” College and Research Libraries 72, no. Novice learners may need to rely on basic indicators of authority, such as type of publication or author credentials, where experts recognize schools of thought or discipline-specific paradigms. It enables students to master course content and extend their investigations beyond the classroom, become more self-directed, and assume greater control over their own learning. This Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education (Framework) grows out of a belief that information literacy as an educational reform movement will realize its potential only through a richer, more complex set of core ideas. Elements that affect or reflect on the creation, such as a pre- or post-publication editing or reviewing process, may be indicators of quality. Experts recognize the collaborative effort within a discipline to extend the knowledge in that field. determine the initial scope of the task required to meet their information needs; identify interested parties, such as scholars, organizations, governments, and industries, who might produce information about a topic and then determine how to access that information; utilize divergent (e.g., brainstorming) and convergent (e.g., selecting the best source) thinking when searching; match information needs and search strategies to appropriate search tools; design and refine needs and search strategies as necessary, based on search results; understand how information systems (i.e., collections of recorded information) are organized in order to access relevant information; use different types of searching language (e.g., controlled vocabulary, keywords, natural language) appropriately; manage searching processes and results effectively. The unique capabilities and constraints of each creation process as well as the specific information need determine how the product is used. However, value may also be leveraged by individuals and organizations to effect change and for civic, economic, social, or personal gains. (Rotterdam, Netherlands: Sense Publishers, 2010). If you have additional questions about ordering the Framework, please contact us at 312-280-5277, or email acrl@ala.org. These six frames are presented alphabetically and do not suggest a particular sequence in which they must be learned. Web Page. (Chicago: Neal-Schuman, 2014). The act of searching often begins with a question that directs the act of finding needed information. However, the rapidly changing higher education environment, along with the dynamic and often uncertain information ecosystem in which all of us work and live, require new attention to be focused on foundational ideas about that ecosystem. Includes bibliographical references and index. a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate. https://www.loc.gov/item/lcwaN0022456/. Experts understand that authority is a type of influence recognized or exerted within a community. develop and maintain an open mind when encountering varied and sometimes conflicting perspectives; motivate themselves to find authoritative sources, recognizing that authority may be conferred or manifested in unexpected ways; develop awareness of the importance of assessing content with a skeptical stance and with a self-awareness of their own biases and worldview; question traditional notions of granting authority and recognize the value of diverse ideas and worldviews; are conscious that maintaining these attitudes and actions requires frequent self-evaluation. A Division of the American Library Association, The Role of the Community College Library in the Academy, Policies and Procedures for Standards, Guidelines, and Frameworks, Pandemic Resources for Academic Libraries, Joint Statement on Access to Research Materials in Archives and Special Collections Libraries, Policy Statement on Open Access to Scholarship by Academic Librarians, Education, Personnel, and Academic Status, ACRL Guidelines for Academic Librarians Without Faculty Status, ACRL Standards for Faculty Status for Academic Librarians, Diversity Standards: Cultural Competency for Academic Libraries, Guideline for the Appointment, Promotion and Tenure of Academic Librarians, Guidelines for Recruiting Academic Librarians, Joint Statement on Faculty Status of College and University Librarians, Statement on the Certification & Licensing of Academic Librarians, Statement on the Terminal Professional Degree for Academic Librarians, Characteristics of Programs of Information Literacy that Illustrate Best Practices: A Guideline, Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, Guidelines for Instruction Programs in Academic Libraries, Information Literacy Competency Standards for Journalism Students and Professionals, Information Literacy Competency Standards for Nursing, Information Literacy Standards for Anthropology and Sociology Students, Information Literacy Standards for Science and Engineering/Technology, Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education, Objectives for Information Literacy Instruction: A Model Statement for Academic Librarians, Political Science Research Competency Guidelines, Psychology Information Literacy Standards, Research Competency Guidelines for Literatures in English, Roles and Strengths of Teaching Librarians, Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, Guidelines for University Library Services to Undergraduate Students, Standards for Libraries in Higher Education, Rare Books, Manuscripts, Special Collections, and Archives, ACRL/RBMS Guidelines For Interlibrary And Exhibition Loan Of Special Collections Materials, Guidelines Regarding Security and Theft in Special Collections, Guidelines on the Selection and Transfer of Materials from General Collections to Special Collections, Guidelines: Competencies for Special Collections Professionals, Standardized Statistical Measures and Metrics for Public Services in Archival Repositories and Special Collections Libraries, ACRL Proficiencies for Assessment Librarians and Coordinators, Guidelines for Curriculum Materials Centers, Guidelines for Media Resources in Academic Libraries, Standards for Distance Learning Library Services, 225 N Michigan Ave, Suite 1300 Chicago, IL 60601 | 1.800.545.2433, Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License, Suggestions on How to Use the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, Introduction for Faculty and Administrators, For Administrators: How to Support the Framework, http://gse.buffalo.edu/fas/shuell/cep564/metacog.htm. Description based on print version record; resource not viewed. The value of information is manifested in various contexts, including publishing practices, access to information, the commodification of personal information, and intellectual property laws. The Framework opens the way for librarians, faculty, and other institutional partners to redesign instruction sessions, assignments, courses, and even curricula; to connect information literacy with student success initiatives; to collaborate on pedagogical research and involve students themselves in that research; and to create wider conversations about student learning, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and the assessment of learning on local campuses and beyond. Communities of scholars, researchers, or professionals engage in sustained discourse with new insights and discoveries occurring over time as a result of varied perspectives and interpretations. Many times, this process includes points of disagreement where debate and dialogue work to deepen the conversations around knowledge. While novice learners and experts at all levels can take part in the conversation, established power and authority structures may influence their ability to participate and can privilege certain voices and information. consider research as open-ended exploration and engagement with information; appreciate that a question may appear to be simple but still disruptive and important to research; value intellectual curiosity in developing questions and learning new investigative methods; maintain an open mind and a critical stance; value persistence, adaptability, and flexibility and recognize that ambiguity can benefit the research process; seek multiple perspectives during information gathering and assessment; follow ethical and legal guidelines in gathering and using information; demonstrate intellectual humility (i.e., recognize their own intellectual or experiential limitations). The information literate student accesses needed information effectively and efficiently. Citations should indicate: Archived in the Library of Congress Web Archives at www.loc.gov. However, the rapidly changing The Library of Congress is making its Web Archives Collection available for educational and research purposes. ACRL's Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (hereafter referred to as the Standards) were published in 2000 and have had wide acceptance by librarians in colleges and universities in the United States and Canada and beyond.Many librarians base their information literacy (IL) instruction programs and assessment instruments on the Standards. 225 N. Michigan Ave. Suite 1300 The Association of College and Research Libraries defines information literacy as “a set of abilities requiring individuals to ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.’” value the skills, time, and effort needed to produce knowledge; see themselves as contributors to the information marketplace rather than only consumers of it; are inclined to examine their own information privilege. To make a takedown request, please contact us via this contact form. When citing a particular website include the archived website's Citation ID (e.g., /item/lcwa00010240). Your donation to the ACRL Advancement Fund, which supports initiatives that strengthen ACRL’s influence in higher education and its ability to create diverse and inclusive communities in the association and the profession, assists us as we continuing to provide these important resources. It also extends the work done by the American Association of School Librarians Task Force on Information Literacy Standards, thereby providing higher education an opportunity to articulate its information 2. These Standards were co-developed with and subsequently endorsed by the American Association for Higher Education and the Council for Independent Colleges. Experts understand that value may be wielded by powerful interests in ways that marginalize certain voices. 3. 1 … You may also need permission from holders of other rights, such as publicity and/or privacy rights. An understanding of this concept enables novice learners to critically examine all evidence—be it a short blog post or a peer-reviewed conference proceeding—and to ask relevant questions about origins, context, and suitability for the current information need. “Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education” (ALA/ACRL, 2000). Thomas P. Mackey and Trudi E. Jacobson. Association Of College And Research Libraries. Providing attribution to relevant previous research is also an obligation of participation in the conversation. Research is iterative and depends upon asking increasingly complex or new questions whose answers in turn develop additional questions or lines of inquiry in any field. Librarians have a greater responsibility in identifying core ideas within their own knowledge domain that can extend learning for students, in creating a new cohesive curriculum for information literacy, and in collaborating more extensively with faculty. United States. Information literacy is related to information technology skills but has broader implications for the individual, the educational system, and for society. My friend read this article with me, and at the end of his reading, summed it up by saying: “Oh, now Google-fu has a name.”. give credit to the original ideas of others through proper attribution and citation; understand that intellectual property is a legal and social construct that varies by culture; articulate the purpose and distinguishing characteristics of copyright, fair use, open access, and the public domain; understand how and why some individuals or groups of individuals may be underrepresented or systematically marginalized within the systems that produce and disseminate information; recognize issues of access or lack of access to information sources; decide where and how their information is published; understand how the commodification of their personal information and online interactions affects the information they receive and the information they produce or disseminate online; make informed choices regarding their online actions in full awareness of issues related to privacy and the commodification of personal information. The Library of Congress would like to hear from any copyright owners who are not properly identified on this website so that we may make the necessary corrections. This new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education focuses on six threshold concepts, ideals to serve as "passageways or portals to enlarged understanding or ways of thinking and … Description based on print version record; resource not viewed. “Objectives for Information Literacy Instruction: A Model Statement for Academic Librarians”; where indicators and standards are integrated with more specific objectives to facilitate teaching-learning process for some expected outcomes (ALA/ACRL, 2001). Experts are therefore inclined to seek out many perspectives, not merely the ones with which they are familiar. Chicago, IL 60601. ACRL has a history of supporting librarians in understanding and using the association’s standards and guidelines. Content outside of the embargo period is updated and made available regularly. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Authority is constructed in that various communities may recognize different types of authority. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education By Association for College and Research Libraries (ACRL) American Library Association (ALA) Abstract Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Introduction. This Framework draws upon an ongoing Delphi Study that has identified several threshold concepts in information literacy,4 but the Framework has been molded using fresh ideas and emphases for the threshold concepts. These standards were reviewed by the ACRL Standards Committee and approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) on January 18, 2000, at the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association in San Antonio, Texas. 3 (2011): 853–69. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners. The Framework is organized into six frames, each consisting of a concept central to information literacy, a set of knowledge practices, and a set of dispositions. 5. To place your order over the phone with a credit card, please call 312-280-5277. 7. For the same reason, these lists should not be considered exhaustive. Information literacy is a key component of lifelong learning and is central to the mission of higher education. Information literacy competency standards for higher education. Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as “Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education” was approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ARCL) on January 18, 2000, at the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association … CONCEPT IL refers to a set of abilities requiring individuals to "recognise when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate and use effectively the needed information… Some content may be under embargo. Get this from a library! Information literacy competency standards for nursing Approved by the ACRL Board of Directors, October 2013 standards and guidelines. It serves as a vehicle for sci-tech librarians to share successful initiatives and innovative ideas, and... Science and Technology Section - Association of College and Research Libraries. You will need written permission from the copyright owners of materials not in the public domain for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. The information literate student determines the nature and extent of the information needed. Model school library standards for California public schools : kindergarten through grade twelve /, Transliteracy in complex information environments. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Research in scholarly and professional fields is a discursive practice in which ideas are formulated, debated, and weighed against one another over extended periods of time. These perspectives might be in their own discipline or profession or may be in other fields. ACRL’s Standards, Guidelines, and Frameworks are provided as a free resource to the academic library community. Such concepts produce transformation within the learner; without them, the learner does not acquire expertise in that field of knowledge. The Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education (originally approved in January 2000) were rescinded by the ACRL Board of Directors on June 25, 2016, at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida, which means they are no longer in force. Information resources reflect their creators’ expertise and credibility, and are evaluated based on the information need and the context in which the information will be used. Students have a greater role and responsibility in creating new knowledge, in understanding the contours and the changing dynamics of the world of information, and in using information, data, and scholarship ethically. During the fifteen years since the publication of the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,1 academic librarians and their partners in higher education associations have developed learning outcomes, tools, and resources that some institutions have deployed to infuse information literacy concepts and skills into their curricula. Authority Is Constructed and ContextualInformation Creation as a ProcessInformation Has ValueResearch as InquiryScholarship as ConversationSearching as Strategic Exploration, Suggestions on How to Use the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher EducationIntroduction for Faculty and AdministratorsFor Faculty: How to Use the FrameworkFor Administrators: How to Support the Framework, Appendix 2: Background of the Framework Development, For current news and resources see the Framework WordPress site. Instead of seeking discrete answers to complex problems, experts understand that a given issue may be characterized by several competing perspectives as part of an ongoing conversation in which information users and creators come together and negotiate meaning. Through a series of conference calls, meetings, and e-mail discussions, the Task Force prepared a draft "Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education.” The draft was presented at higher education and library meetings and posted on the ACRL Web site in order to solicit feedback.